New Ebook Released Today: The Complete Expedition Touring Bike Buyer’s Guide

Today I’m publishing my second ebook – a follow-up to last year’s cycle touring equipment guide.

[Link: Get the new ebook here.]

This new ebook, The Complete Expedition Touring Bike Buyer’s Guide, aims to tackle one very big and very specific question:

“Exactly what kind of bicycle should I take on a huge worldwide cycling adventure?”

In doing so, it also aims to answer the two underlying questions most newcomers have:

“I don’t know anything about bikes – how the heck am I supposed to know what I’m looking for?”

And:

“Even if I do figure out what bike I need, where and how am I supposed to get one?”

You see, the most common type of person I hear from who is considering such an adventure is not a cyclist.

He or she (or you?) is someone who, for one reason or another, has realised that travelling by bicycle will give them what they’re looking for from the travelling experience – access to the great outdoors, enviable independence, exercise, cultural immersion, thinking time, the ability to travel on a super low budget – whatever it may be.

The point is that – for most of us – the touring bicycle is a tool to do a job, not an object of desire per se.

So the intention behind the guide is similar to that of my previous guide: to cut through the endless arguments and conflicting advice surrounding the topic of expedition touring bike choice, specifically for the benefit of non-gear nerds.

The reader of The Complete Expedition Touring Bike Buyer’s Guide will be able to bypass the endless debates on internet forums over whether one might be best off with derailleur gears or a Rohloff hub, disc brakes or rim brakes, 26-inch or 700C wheels, or steel or aluminium frames.

The truth is that these questions have all been answered a hundred times already – plus, there are far more important things to think about when choosing an expedition touring bike anyway. (If you had no idea these debates existed, by the way, trust me: you don’t want to go there.)

The guide does cover many of the technicalities (with illustrations), simply because I do believe that it’s important to know how the bike you’re riding has been put together – chances are you’ll need to get your hands dirty with maintenance and repairs sooner or later.

The guide wraps up with a nice big listing of expedition-grade touring bike manufacturers whose bikes are available around the world, either direct, through dealerships, as frames for building a bike upon, or as custom-built offerings.

Making the best choice is more about the bikes you have actual, physical access to as about which bike looks ‘best’ on paper, so this listing is likely to come in very useful. (A constantly-updated version of this listing is also freely available here on the blog.)

The 72-page, fully-illustrated PDF guide is released today at the ultra-affordable price of £9 (about $15) – an infinitesimally tiny fraction of the average budget for actually buying such a bicycle.

Head over here to check it out.

And if the idea takes you, why not buy yourself a copy? As well as having the contents of the touring-bike portion of my brain at your fingertips, you’ll be helping keep this blog alive into its 9th year, and for that I shall thank you greatly.

Comments here.

A Massive List Of Touring Bikes For Worldwide Cycling Expeditions

After an irritatingly large amount of research, I am pleased (and frankly relieved) to present to you a tabulated list of expedition touring bikes, featuring bicycles from no less than 52 manufacturers to date. The table is intended as an evolving and handy guide to researching and tracking down the many and varied suppliers of expedition grade touring bikes available…

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